useful guide: water-to-grain ratios

Useful Guide: Water-to-Grain Ratios
Uncategorized

Whole grains are a staple in many diets, along with beans and legumes, vegetables and fruit. Whole grains are low in calories, satiating and full of many health benefits.

There are so many wonderful kinds of interchangeable grains out there, which makes it easy to mix things up with different varieties on recipes you love. Like rice most grains cook fairly similarly, however, the amount of water and cooking times do vary for various grains, which is detailed in the list below. You can follow your package instructions, use your rice cooker or even a pressure cooker.

Amaranth

Amaranth is a pseudo-cereal and is one hundred percent gluten-free! When cooked they resemble brown caviar. It’s slightly peppery taste with a high level of protein and is popular in baking (sweet or savour), cereals and crackers.

Barley

Hulled and pearled are the most common types of barley. Although chewier, hulled barley is more nutritious. Both types of barely can be added to soups or stews, or used as base for any side salad or dish.

Black Rice

This medium-grain rice is a Chinese variety, which contains all the whole grain goodness of brown rice and is sweeter in flavour.

Brown Rice

The secret, it’s great to cook it ahead and freeze it.

Buckwheat

Use it as a substitute for rice as a side dish. What’s more, buckwheat flour is great for pancakes and Japanese soba noodles made from ground buckwheat are great in recipes that require stir-fry noodles, like Pad Thai.

Bulgur

Bulgur is ready as quickly as dried pasta. Unlike some other wheat grains, bulgur stays soft even when chilled or at room temperature. Bulgur can be used in Middle Eastern dishes like Tabouli and pilafs.

Cornmeal (Polenta)

Corn is the only grain that is eaten as a vegetable. Cornmeal (Polenta) can be boiled into a porridge, mashed or purèed, it’s super versatile.

Whole-wheat Couscous

Whole-wheat Couscous is an easy substitute for many rice dishes and is great in salads too.

Farro (Emmer)

Farro is a staple in Italy. It always stays al dente no matter how much you cook it, which makes it ideal in baked dishes.

Millet

Millet is tiny and tender with a subtle sweetness, making it perfect in any light side dish or salad.

Oats

There are many different types of oats with different cooking times and instructions, however, they are all healthy and tasty.

Whole-wheat Pasta

There are many kinds of pasta (including gluten-free), and most of them can be interchangeable in almost any pasta recipe.

Quinoa

Quinoa is a seed and is available in many varieties (red, white, and black), which are all interchangeable. It cooks up soft and fluffy and has a mild and nutty flavor. You can use quinoa in place of rice, in pilafs, salads, or even with fruit for breakfast.

Wheat Berries

Wheat berries are unprocessed kernels of wheat. They pop when you eat them and are hearty and chewy in texture. They freeze perfectly and can be used in soups, stews and salads.

Wild Rice

Wild rice is a semi-aquatic grass. It requires more cooking time than white or brown rice (but equally interchangeable), and once it’s cooked it splits open, so keep an eye out when cooking.

 

Grain Amount Water/Vegetable stock Cooking Time
Amaranth 1 cup 2 cups 15-20 minutes
Bring to a boil, then simmer and cover for 15-20 minutes until done.
Barely 1 cup 3 cups 45-60 minutes
Bring to a boil, then simmer and cover for 45-60 minutes until done.
Black Rice 1 cup 2 cups 35 minutes
Bring to a boil, then simmer and cover for 35 minutes until done.
Brown Rice 1 cup 2 ½ cups  25-45 minutes
Bring to a boil, then simmer and cover for 35 minutes until done. (Or follow the instructions from the rice cooker).
Buckwheat 1 cup 2 cups 20 minutes
Bring to a boil, then simmer and cover for 20 minutes until done. 
Bulgur 1 cup 2 cups 10-12 minutes
Bring to a boil, then simmer and cover for 10-12 minutes until done. 
Cornmeal (Polenta) 1 cup 4 cups 25-30 minutes
Bring to a boil, then simmer and cover for 25-30 minutes until done. 
Whole-wheat Couscous 1 cup 1 ¼ cups 5 minutes or less
Bring water or vegetable stock to a boil. Immediately turn off the heat, add the whole-wheat couscous and cover. Once the couscous absorbs the liquid (5 minutes or less), fluff using a fork.
Farro (Emmer)  1 cup 2 ½ cups  25-40 minutes
Bring to a boil, then simmer and cover for 25-40 minutes until done. 
Millet  1 cup 2 ½ cups  25-35 minutes
Bring to a boil, then simmer and cover for 25-35 minutes until done. 
Steel Cut Oats 1 cup 3 cups 30-40 minutes
Bring water or dairy-free milk to a boil, then simmer and cover for 25-35 minutes until done (stirring occasionally). 
Rolled Oats 1 cup 2 cups  15-20 minutes
Bring to a water or dairy-free milk to a boil first. Add the oats then simmer for 15-20 minutes until done (stirring occasionally). 
Whole-wheat Pasta
Follow package instructions.
Quinoa 1 cup 2 cups  12-15 minutes
Bring to a boil, then simmer and cover for 12-15 minutes until done. 
Wheat Berries 1 cup 4 cups 45-60 minutes
Pre-soak the wheat berries overnight and strain. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat to a gentle simmer and cover for 45-60 minutes until done. 
Wild Rice 1 cup  3 cups 45-55 minutes
Bring to a boil, then simmer and cover for 45-55 minutes until done. (Or follow the instructions from the rice cooker).

For further information check out our website or contact Anisha, anisha@azada.es

Suscribe to our promotions and recipes

Newsletter